8 Steps For Washing Clip In Hair Extensions?

hair-extensions
Spread the word...Share!

Seamless hair extensions are perfect at adding volume, depth, and length to your natural hair. Whether you need to add highlights, color, or more oomph, rocking those clip in extensions that allow you many changing options up, you look with the clip’s click.

There are various selections with the great options available now from high end to 100% real human hair. Different hair extensions users opt for 100% real human hair options as its cost-effective solution for price and last top quality.

However, when you invest in high-quality Remy hair extensions, you want to make sure your lifespan and keep looking fabulous and fresh for as long as possible. If your hair extensions feel like they are becoming difficult to style, it’s a sign that there is a product build-up and needs to be washed. We highly recommend washing your hair extensions once in a month or after 30 wears.

Here we’ll provide you the rundown on how to get your extensions clean, as well as how to restore shine and moisture. You must know that the less you wash your hair extensions longer they will last. However, here are some essential steps that perfectly explain how to wash clips in hair extensions.

Step 1: Brush Hair Extensions

It’s one of the essential steps to carefully brush your clip in hair extensions out before getting them wet. It will help you to minimize the tangling during and after you wash the extension. We strongly recommend starting from the bottom to top to gently remove any tough knots without pulling hair out when brushing the hair extension. Try to use the soft bristle brush or wide-tooth comb when working on extensions.

During the preparation of washing extension, neatly place wefts on top of each other, similar to the same way as when you received them. It will help you to ensure the hair doesn’t tangle with clips during the wash.

Step 2: Prepare Sink For Washing Extensions

Before the washing process, ensure your sink squeaky clean, plug the drain, and fill it up with warm water, remember. No need to use too cold or too hot water. After squirting 3 to 4 pumps in the water and wave the water around to ensure the product is evenly dispersed.

When working with hair extensions, we recommend using alcohol-free, designed for colored treated hair and sulfate-free products, or extensions to ensure the color is preserved.

Step 3: Shampoo Wefts

We recommend applying moisturizing alcohol-free and sulfate-free conditioner after and before shampooing. In some situations, skip the shampoo and co-wash your hair extension with a conditioner!

 To prevent tangling and to wash thoroughly, carefully, wash each weft at one time. If you’re in a short time, you can also bundle the extension with an elastic and wash them carefully in a single short. You can hold the weft one hand at the top, merge it into the water, and clean hair gently, working the shampoo in with light strokes.

Make sure to handle extensions when washing and not rub them vigorously as you would with your real hair. Once you’ve washed the weft with shampoo, set it aside neatly on a towel and repeat the same steps for all wefts.

Step 4: Condition Wefts

After completing the shampoo process, it’s time to condition wefts. For that, take a well amount of conditioner and apply it onto the wefts but separately (one by one) from top to bottom. Softly massage the conditioner thoroughly into the hair and leave for 7 to 10 minutes, then rinse out each weft thoroughly. According to the general rule, the longer you leave it on, the better.

Step 5: Apply Deep Conditioner on Hair Mask

This step is a bit crucial to ensure that hair extensions remain moisturized and soft. Like your conditioner, take a great deal about the hair mask and work the product into each weft from top to bottom. For the product to soak in, bundle your extensions, and carefully coil them and place them in a shower cap to leave throughout the night. It’ll help you to seal in the moisture overnight.

Step 6: Carefully Rinse Out Each Weft

The next day, thoroughly rinse out wefts one by one and ensure that there’s no conditioner residue left on the hair. Generally, a common mistake is to wash the hair halfway, leaving it with the slip that slippery, smooth, and soft feeling after conditioning as it leaves product on the hair, which weighs it down to look greasy when dry.

When you carefully wash out each weft, rinse it again with the cold water, which helps close the hair cuticles to seal in moisture and make the extension shinier.

Step 7: Dry Hair Extensions

First, squeeze any excess water from the extensions and never rub the extensions dry with a towel.  We highly recommend you to avoid blow drying because it will damage your extensions. So, air drying is the best option whenever possible. Be sure when air drying to invest in a fiber towel, as it’ll remove excess water faster, and it won’t rough up hair.

Layout wefts on a flat surface and pat the excess moisture from hair. A trick to prevent any frizz once the hair is applied is to apply a small amount of oil each weft to ensure the hair remains manageable and silky smooth.

Step 8: Comb Wefts

Usually, wet hair combing is not recommended because the hair is in its fragile state. However, to ensure hair extensions dry straight, you can make an exception. Brush gently through each weft with the wide-tooth comb. After that, leave a weft to dry and come back to smooth and clean extensions, ready to clip into your hair.

Conclusion

Taking care of your extensions is the most critical aspect of having extensions in the first place. Washing clip in hair extension is not a complicated process if you have all the required products and common sense. The complete procedure is explained in this blog; we hope you understand the instructions to wash clip in hair extensions.

Kanika Gautam
About Kanika Gautam 175 Articles
Kanika is an ardent writer and a serial blogger in addition to being the founder of yourmotivationguru.com where she writes about growing the happiness ratio of life. She is also a technologist, bibliophile, speaker, educator and writer.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*